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Asiatic Lily, Camden Maine Bed and Breakfast
camden maine bed and breakfast cottages
  1. Blooming Now At The Inn!

    Camden, Maine

    So hard to choose what to highlight with so much happening at once. But here are a few picks.

    Oriental Poppies

    Oriental Poppies

    Oriental poppies add a colorful punch in our expansive perennial “S” garden with a large and fragrant Lilac shrub in full bloom in the background.

    Bearded Iris

    Bearded Iris

    Intense blue Veronica provides a dramatic background for the delicate colors of this German Iris.

    Rhododedron

    Rhododendron

    One of many blooming Rhododendrons here at our Inn. This one receives the perfect amount of dappled sunlight.

    Dianthus

    Dianthus

    Large mats of fragrant Dianthus are easy to grow. We have been meaning to divide these for years now.

    Peonies

    Peonies

    Several raised gardens in the foreground with our “S” garden in the background. Peonies starting to pop.

    Peony Jules

    Peony "Jules"

    Peony “Jules Elie” with its extra large pink flowers.

    Cherub Garden

    Cherub Garden

    Eye-popping blue Amsonia planted alongside the brilliant yellow flowers of Coreopsis line the pathway leading through a rose arbor and down to the cherub water fountain.

    Digitalis

    Digitalis (Foxglove)

    Tall spikes of Digitalis grace numerous spots in the gardens, here they attract hummingbirds and bees to our vegetable patch.

  2. We Picked Our First Dahlia Bloom “Prom Queen”!

    Yes, we are excited! We picked our first dahlia bloom on June 1st! Remember those tubers that we potted up back in March? Well, some of the potted tubers have grown stems to over 2+ feet laden with buds,  and they were begging to get out of their pots! Being mindful of a possible frost we waited until May 22 before digging them into the ground. We have 125 plants in the dahlia garden to date with approx. 175 yet to be planted.

    Dahlia "Prom Queen"

    Dahlia "Prom Queen"

  3. Our Maine Gardens – Photos

    A Peek At What’s Bloomin’

    Bishop's Hat Blossoms

    Epimedium - "Bishop's Hat" Blossoms

    We love Epimedium’s heart shaped leaves with delicate pink and white flowers. Large patches grace numerous shaded garden spots. This one sits at the base of an old and very large Ash tree that shades the plant almost entirely from the sun.

    Bergenia - "Pigsqueak"

    Bergenia - "Pigsqueak"

    A small mass of Bergenia receives a good dose of mid-morning sun and remains shaded for the rest of the day. This plant has been moved countless times over the years before finding its happy place here among a Hosta patch.

    Euphorbia - "Spurge"

    Euphorbia - "Spurge"

    Color, color, color! Fluorescent Euphorbia is a real eye opener and loves full sun.

    Trollious "Globle Flower"

    Trollious "Globle Flower"

    It is said that Trollious may re-bloom if you remove faded flowers promptly and cut back foliage to the ground in the summer. We have yet to have such luck with this magnificent spring bloomer twice in a season, but that’s okay.

    Dicentra "Bleeding Heart"

    Dicentra "Bleeding Heart"

    Flower cuttings from our old fashioned Bleeding Heart mixed with striking variegated Hosta leaves fill vases and grace all the accommodations at our bed and breakfast.

    Anemone "Windflower"

    Anemone "Windflower"

    The bright welcoming faces of Anemone cultivar “Macrantha” spreads quickly and on occasion will re-bloom later in the season. Be sure to dead head in a timely fashion to control its abundant self seeding nature.

    What’s bloomin’ in your garden???

  4. The Lily Leaf Beetle

    Red Beetle Alert!

    This spring, with warmer than usual temps., brings early evidence of destructive and nasty garden pests. Would you believe I detected Lily Leaf Beetles already feasting on our treasured hybrid lilies in March! These beetles over winter in the soil and rear their ugly heads in the spring. Hurry up, they work quickly. The female lays her eggs(and she is quite prolific) on the underside of the lily leaves and that is how an infestation of ravenous larvae can go undetected. You must eradicate them before they annihilate your precious lilies.

    Lily Leaf Beetle

    Lily Leaf Beetle

    Lily

    Lily

    We spray with a botanical insecticide as soon as the lilies pop up from the ground in addition to snatching the beetles off of the greenery and crushing them whenever one is detected.

    Lily

    Lily

    Here the yellow arrow indicates a hole in a lily leaf where the red beetle has been feeding. This is nothing compared to what will happen if left untreated.

    Lily

    Lily

    2 Lily Leaf Beetles at work.

    Lily

    Lily

    If you grow just a few hybrid lilies you may hand pick the beetles regularly but be sure to check under ALL the lily leaves DAILY and remove any eggs you find by cutting the leaf and destroying the eggs. For photos of Lily Leaf Beetle eggs and larvae you may find them on one of our previous blogs.

  5. Camden, Maine’s “Early” Spring

    Spring has arrived in Maine and warmer than average temps. have brought us early blossoms!

    Japanese Red Maple

    Japanese Red Maple

    Tiny leaves on many trees are beginning to appear.

    Cinnamon Fern

    Cinnamon Fern

    Delicate fern heads are emerging and soon will leaf out into graceful fronds.

    Star Magnolia Buds

    Magnolia Bud

    The fragrantly sweet scent of our  Magnolia tree’s flowers fill the air.

    Star Magnolia Blossom

    Magnolia Blossom

    Pasque flowers are a spring time favorite of which there are many deep rich colors. The urn-shaped flower sits above feathery bracts of delicate spiny greenery and follows up with a most unusual seed head that adds intrigue to the garden. Unfortunately our “Blue Bell” which has dark violet flowers did not survive this past winter, however our wine and white colored varieties are flourishing.

    Pulsatilla (Pasque Flower)

    Pulsatilla (Pasque Flower)

    White Pasque Flower

    White Pasque Flower

    Shade-loving Pulmonaria brightens up a dark spot in the garden with its blue and pink flowers and continues to add interest after it blooms with handsome white speckled foliage.

    Pulmonaria (Lungwart)

    Pulmonaria (Lungwart)

    Large bright pink patches of creeping Phlox are spilling over the edges of numerous rock walls and best of all they will re-bloom later in the season.

    Phlox (Creeping)

    Phlox (Creeping)

    We have two varieties of Primula (Primrose) that we grow in a shady spot in the Rhododendron garden. A carpet of Primula “Alba” blooms first and has bright white pompoms that is quite impressive en masse.

    Primula (Alba)

    Primula (Alba)

    Arabis (Rock Cress)

    Arabis (Rock Cress)

    Pillowy mounds of Arabis grace precious garden spaces. Here it is happy sitting atop one of our stone walls.

  6. Garlic Unveiled – Camden, ME

    Warmer than usual temp. this Spring had us uncovering our garlic patch here in Mid-Coast Maine approx. 2-3 weeks earlier than usual.

    A Heavy Mulch Of Straw And Leaves

    A Heavy Mulch Of Straw And Leaves

    It seems like it was only last month when we planted our garlic cloves and shared with you our planting techniques this past November.

    Carefully Uncovering The Patch

    Carefully Uncovering The Patch

    We remove the mulch bedding with care. Tender growth can easily “snap off “.

    Tender Growth

    Tender Growth

    A layer of straw if left on the ground to control weeds.

    Leaving A Bedding Of Straw

    Leaving A Bedding Of Straw

    One week later with warm temps. and lots of sun our garlic has greened up.

    1 Week Later

    1 Week Later

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